History & Social Science

This story shall the good man teach his son; 
And Crispin Crispian shall ne’er go by, 
From this day to the ending of the world, 
But we in it shall be remembered- 
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; 
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me 
Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile, 
This day shall gentle his condition; 
And gentlemen in England now-a-bed 
William Shakespeare’s Henry V 
 
The Department of History & Social Sciences facilitates within its students the ability to understand the past in order to think critically about the contemporary world.
 
The study of history has fascinated generations of men and women, all yearning to draw conclusions or live in another man's time. Whatever the motivation, history has stirred the passions of many, statesmen like Winston Churchill, military leaders like Napoleon Bonaparte, and would-be revolutionaries like Martin Luther. History engrosses people like no other subject because they are given the opportunity to learn about the moments in time that have shaped who we are today.  Indeed, these very moments, whether we choose to agree, are the very fabric of our being: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the Magna Carta, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the Scientific Revolution, the Battle of Quebec, the Storming of the Bastille, the Irish Potato Famine, D-Day, the Holocaust, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and 9/11, just to name a few. Our understanding of these events help our greater understanding of humanity and the human condition. 
 
At St. Andrew's College, the Department of History & Social Sciences strives to bring these, and many other events, to life, by not just memorizing dates and times, but fostering a true understanding of the significance of the event within the grand scheme of human history. Our students learn to think critically about history, while learning the skills to write effectively about it.  In the end, studying history at St. Andrew's lays a solid foundation for further study in any discipline at the post-secondary level. It is, in my opinion, significant for every student to have a basic grasp of both national and world history. 
 
Someone once wrote that history must be written for the survivors, so that their experience is never forgotten. History should be taught and embraced by those who have never had to weather the storms which have pushed humankind to the very limits, in the hope that we all appreciate the fortune of our time.
 
David D. Stewart
Head, Department of History & Social Sciences
 
 
COURSES
 
ECONOMICS
  • The Individual and the Economy, Grade 11, University/College Preparation
    CIE3M 
    Prerequisite: Canadian History Since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

    This course explores challenges facing the Canadian economy as well as the implications of various responses to these challenges. Students will explore the economic role of business, labour, and government, as well as their own role as individual consumers and contributors, and how all of these influence stability and variability in the Canadian economy. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, including economic models, to investigate the impact of economic decisions.

  • The Individual and the Economy, Grade 11, University/College Preparation
    CIE3MP
    Prerequisite: Canadian History Since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

    This course will be taught in conjunction with the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum

    This course explores challenges facing the Canadian economy as well as the implications of various responses to these challenges. Students will explore the economic role of business, labour, and government, as well as their own role as individual consumers and contributors, and how all of these influence stability and variability in the Canadian economy. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, including economic models, to investigate the impact of economic decisions.

    *St. Andrew’s College entrance requirement
    Recommended minimum average of 75% in grade 10 history, math, and English, as well as a sincere desire to work at the accelerated pace required of the Advanced Placement curriculum.

  • Analysing Current Economic Issues, Grade 12, University Preparation 
    CIA4U   
    Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities 

    Recommended Preparation: CIE3M with >= 80% or permission of the department

    This course will be taught in conjunction with the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum

    This course examines current national and global economic trends and policies from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the impact of choices that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in responding to local, national, and global economic issues such as globalization and global economic inequalities, trade agreements, national debt, taxation, social spending, and consumer debt. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, including economic models, to investigate, and develop informed opinions about, current economic issues and to help them make reasoned economic decisions
    .
    With respect to the AP component of the program, the aim is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in a typical university introductory micro and macroeconomics course. The course, as it is taught at St. Andrew’s College, builds on the knowledge already gained in grade 11 Economics. Instruction is divided into two parts: the first half of the course is devoted to the study of micro-economics. It emphasizes the nature and function of product markets and includes a study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. The second half of the course examines macroeconomic theory. This gives students substantial knowledge of the principles of economics that apply to the economic system as a whole. In particular, instruction examines economic performance measures, economic growth, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation and unemployment, and the various fields of international economics. Two external examinations are required: one in micro-economics and one in macro-economics. Both are administered by the Advanced Placement program of The College Board of the United States.

    OSS Equivalence: This course is cross-listed with CIA4U. Thus, this course will appear as CIA4U on the Ontario Student Transcript 
 
HISTORY
  • Canadian History Since World War I, Grade 10, Academic 
    CHC2D 
    Prerequisite: None

    This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.
  • Canadian History Since World War I, Extended French, Grade 10, Academic 
    CHC2DF 
    Prerequisite: None
    Note: This course is taken concurrently with FEF2D, Grade 10 

    This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.
  • American History, Grade 11, University Preparation 
    CHA3UP 
    Prerequisite: Canadian History Since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied
    SAC Recommended Preparation: CHW3M taken prior to or taken concurrently.

    This course will be taught in conjunction with the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum.

    This course traces the social, economic, and political development of the United States from colonial times to the present. Students will explore the historical context of key developments that shaped the United States, its identity and culture, and its role in the global community. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating forces in American history.
  • World History to the End of the Fifteenth Century Grade 11, University/College Preparation 
    CHW3M
       
    Prerequisite: Canadian History Since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

    This course explores the history of various societies around the world, from earliest times to around 1500 CE. Students will examine life in and the legacy of various ancient and pre-modern societies throughout the world, including those in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating social, political, and economic structures and historical forces at work in various societies and in different historical eras.
  • Canada: History, Identity, and Culture, Grade 12, University Preparation
    CHI4U 
    Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities
    Recommended Preparation: CHT3O or CHW3M

    This course traces the history of Canada, with a focus on the evolution of our national identity and culture. Students will explore various developments and events, both national and international, from precontact to the present, and will examine various communities in Canada and how they have contributed to the development of Canadian identity and heritage. Students will develop their sense of Canada’s national identity and how and why it has changed throughout the country’s history. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate the people, events, and forces that have shaped Canada.
  • World History Since the Fifteenth Century, Grade 12, University Preparation 
    CHY4U
       
    Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities
    Recommended preparation: CHT3O or CHW3M

    This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic, and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and assess societal progress or decline in world history.
Advanced Placement (AP):  With departmental approval, students may elect to prepare for an AP exam related to this course.
 
LAW
  • Understanding Canadian Law, Grade 11 University/College Preparation 
    CLU3M 
    Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

    This course explores Canadian law, with a focus on legal issues that are relevant to the lives of people in Canada. Students will gain an understanding of rights and freedoms in Canada, our legal system, and family, contract, employment, tort, and criminal law. Students will use case studies and apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal inquiry process to develop legal reasoning skills and to formulate and communicate informed interpretations of legal issues, and they will develop the ability to advocate for new laws.
  • Canadian and International Law, Grade 12, University Preparation
    CLN4Ue
    Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

    This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop their understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law when exploring rights and freedoms within the context of topics such as religion, security, cyberspace, immigration, crimes against humanity, and environmental protection. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal inquiry process when investigating these issues in both Canadian and international contexts, and they will develop legal reasoning skills and an understanding of conflict resolution in the area of international law.
 
POLITICS
  • Civics and Citizenship, Grade 10, Open    
    CHV2OR 
    Prerequisite: None
    Half course to be paired with Career Studies, Grade 10, Open

    This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.
  • Canadian and World Politics, Grade 12, University Preparation
    CPW4U 
    Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities
    Recommended Preparation: CIE3M, CHT3O, or CHY4U taken either prior to this course or taken concurrently with this course.

    This course explores various perspectives on issues in Canadian and world politics. Students will explore political decision-making and ways in which individuals, stakeholder groups, and various institutions, including different levels of government, multinational corporations, and non-governmental organizations, respond to and work to influence domestic and international developments. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate current political policies, issues, and events, and to develop and communicate informed opinions about them.
 
PHILOSOPHY
  • Philosophy: The Big Questions, Grade 11, Open 
    HZB3M
    Prerequisite: None

    This course encourages exploration of philosophy’s big questions, such as: What is a meaningful life? What separates right from wrong? What constitutes knowledge? What makes something beautiful? What is a just society? Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they identify and analyse the responses of philosophers to the big questions and formulate their own response to them. Students will explore the relevance of philosophical questions to society and to their everyday life. They will develop research and inquiry skills as they investigate various topics in philosophy.
  • Philosophy: Questions and Theories, Grade 12, University Preparation
    HZT4U
    Prerequisite: Any university or university/college course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

    This course enables students to acquire an understanding of the nature of philosophy and philosophical reasoning skills and to develop and apply their knowledge and skills while exploring specialized branches of philosophy (the course will cover at least three of the following branches: metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, philosophy of science, social and political philosophy, and aesthetics). Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they formulate and evaluate arguments related to a variety of philosophical questions and theories. They will also develop research and inquiry skills related to the study and practice of philosophy.
 
WORLD RELIGIONS
  • World Religions and Belief Traditions: Perspectives, Issues, and Challenges, Grade 11, University/College Preparation 
    HRT3M 
    Prerequisite: None

    This course provides students with opportunities to explore various world religions and belief traditions. Students will develop knowledge of the terms and concepts relevant to this area of study, will examine the ways in which religions and belief traditions meet various human needs, and will learn about the relationship between belief and action. They will examine sacred writings and teachings, consider how concepts of time and place influence different religions and belief traditions, and develop research and inquiry skills related to the study of human expressions of belief.
  • Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology Online Course, Grade 11, University/College Preparation 
    HSP3Ue
    Prerequisite: The grade 10 academic course in English or the grade 10 academic history course (Canadian and world studies).

    This online course provides students with opportunities to think critically about theories, questions, and issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science, and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues within the three disciplines.
  • Challenge and Change in Society Online Course Grade 12, University/College Preparation
    HSB4Ue
    Prerequisite: Any University or University/College, in social sciences and humanities, English or Canadian and world studies
     
    This online course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will critically analyse how and why cultural, social, and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.
 
INFLUENTIAL BOOKS
 
It is my belief that you must have a passion for reading in order to fully appreciate the study of history. In the 21st Century, historiography is conveyed by several mediums, all valid in their own way. But, most historians would agree, that there is, indeed, something special about understanding human history via the printed word. I asked my department members about their most influential pieces of literature. Here are some examples of their most influential books:
 
Bruce Roffey
Chaplain, St. Andrew's College
 
  • Gospel of John
  • The Book of Isaiah
  • The Letter of James
  • I am a Mathematician by Norbert Weiner
  • Mere Christianity and The Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis
  • Memories, Dreams, Reflections by C. G. Jung
 
David D. Stewart
Head, Department of History and Social Sciences
 
  • John Adams by David McCullough
  • Silas Marner by George Eliot
  • Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt
  • The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan
  • The Fall of Berlin by Antony Beevor
  • Barometer Rising by Hugh MacLennan
  • Paris 1919 by Margaret Macmillan
  • Maus I and II by Art Spiegelman
  • In Flanders Fields by Leon Wolff
  • The Wars by Timothy Findley
  • Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden
  • Night by Elie Weisel
  • Regeneration by Pat Barker
  • Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
 
Len Gurr, 
Department of History and Social Sciences
Head Coach, Varsity Football and Varsity Baseball
 
  • John Adams by David McCullough
  • 1776 by David McCullough
  • Franklin and Winston by Jon Meacham
  • The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
  • Primal Leadership by Daniel Goleman, Annie McKee, and Richard Boyatzis
St. Andrew's College
15800 Yonge Street, Aurora, ON L4G 3H7 Canada
Tel: 905-727-3178